MYTHOLOGY

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© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015
'MYTHOLOGY'

depictions of
   
The Classic Male Nude
    
  Male nudes posing and depicting characters and scenes from Ancient Mythology



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MYTHOLOGY

The term mythology can refer to either the study of myths, or to a body of myths.
For example, comparative mythology is the study of connections between myths from different cultures, whereas Greek mythology is the body of myths from ancient Greece.
In the study of folklore, a myth is a sacred narrative explaining how the world and humankind came to be in their present form.
Many scholars in other fields use the term "myth" in somewhat different ways.
In a very broad sense, the word can refer to any traditional story.

Allegory

Some theories propose that myths began as allegories. According to one theory, myths began as allegories for natural phenomena: Apollo represents fire, Poseidon represents water, and so on. According to another theory, myths began as allegories for philosophical or spiritual concepts: Athena represents wise judgment, Aphrodite represents desire, etc.
The 19th century Sanskritist Max Müller supported an allegorical theory of myth. He believed that myths began as allegorical descriptions of nature, but gradually came to be interpreted literally: for example, a poetic description of the sea as "raging" was eventually taken literally, and the sea was then thought of as a raging god.

Mythology and Art


With the rediscovery of classical antiquity in Renaissance, the poetry of Ovid became a major influence on the imagination of poets and artists and remained a fundamental influence on the diffusion and perception of Greek mythology through subsequent centuries.
From the early years of Renaissance, artists portrayed subjects from Greek mythology alongside more conventional Christian themes. 
In recent times authors such as Thomas Bulfinch and Nathaniel Hawthorne, believed that myths should provide pleasure, and held that the study of the classical myths was essential to the understanding of English and Americal literature.
According to Bulfinch, "the so-called divinities of Olympus have not a single worshipper among living men; they belong now not to the department of theology, but to those of literature and taste".
In more recent times, classical themes have been reinterpreted by such major dramatists as Jean Anouilh, Jean Cocteau, and Jean Giraudoux in France, Eugene O'Neill in America, and T. S. Eliot in England and by great novelists such as the Irish James Joyce and the French André Gide. Richard Strauss, Jacques Offenbach and many others have set Greek mythological themes to music.





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'Θάνατος'
(Thanatos)

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In Greek mythology, Thanatos ("Death," from - thnesko, "to die, be dying") was the daemon personification of death.
He was a minor figure in Greek mythology, often referred to but rarely appearing in person. His name is transliterated in Latin as Thanatus, but his equivalent in Roman mythology is Mors.
In later eras, as the transition from life to death in Elysium became a more attractive option, Thanatos came to be seen as a beautiful Ephebe.
He became associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise.
Many Roman sarcophagi depict him as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid.
Thanatos has also been portrayed as a slumbering infant in the arms of his mother Nyx, or as a youth carrying a butterfly (the ancient Greek word "ψυχή" can mean soul or butterfly, or life, amongst other things) or a wreath of poppies (poppies were associated with Hypnos and Thanatos because of their hypnogogic traits and the eventual death engendered by overexposure to them).
He is often shown carrying an inverted torch (holding it upside down in his hands), representing a life extinguished. 





Τεῦκρος
'TEUCER'

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In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his concubine slave Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy.
He fought alongside his half-brother, Ajax, in the Trojan War and is the legendary founder of the city Salamis on Cyprus.
Teucer was the nephew of King Priam of Troy and so the cousin of Hector and Paris - all of whom he fought against in the Trojan War.
During the Trojan War, Teucer was mainly a great archer who loosed his shafts behind the giant shield of his half-brother Ajax the Great. When Hector was driving the Achaeans back toward their ships, Teucer gave the Argives some success by killing many of the charging Trojans, including Hector's charioteer, Archeptolemus son of Iphitos. However every time he shot an arrow at Hector, Apollo, the protector of the Trojans, would foil the shot - an ironic reference to the fact that Apollo would guide Paris' arrow into Achilles' heel.






Αδωνις
'ADONIS'
أودنيس شاب فائق الجمال

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Vittotio Carvelli Adonis, originally a Phoenician god (Phoenicia being modern day Lebanon), also known in Greek mythology as a favorite of Aphrodite (Greek: Adonis, "lord") is a figure with Northwest Semitic antecedents, where he is a central cult figure in various mystery religions, who entered Greek mythology.His cult belonged to women: the cult of dying Adonis was fully-developed in the circle of young girls around the poet Sappho from the island of Lesbos, about 600 BCE, as revealed in a fragment of Sappho's surviving poetry.The beautiful Adonis was the young lover of Venus.He was killed by a wild boar in the hunt and died in her arms after she came to him when hearing his groans.Upon death, she sprinkled his blood with blood; and the short-lived windflower, anemone, which takes its name from the wind which so easily makes it fall, was produced.






'HERMES'

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'Νίκη' - ( VICTORY)
انتصار

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Vittorio CarvelliIn Greek mythology, (Greek: Νίκη "Victory") was a goddess who personified victory throughout the ages of the ancient Greek culture.She is known as the Winged Goddess of Victory. The Roman equivalent was Victoria.Depending upon the time of various myths, she was described as the daughter of Pallas (Titan) and Styx (Water), and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (violence), and Zelus (Zeal). Nike and her siblings were close companions of Zeus, the dominant deity of the Greek pantheon. According to classical myth, Styx brought them to Zeus when the god was assembling allies for the Titan War against the older deities. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer, a role in which she often is portrayed in Classical Greek art. Nike flew around battlefields rewarding the victors with glory and fame. This contemporary image is very unusual, int that Nike is depicted in masculine form, holding a palm of victory.




'Ἄτλας' - (ATLAS)

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Vittorio Carvelli In Greek mythology, Atlas was the primordial Titan who supported the heavens. Although associated with various places, he became commonly identified with the Atlas Mountains in north-west Africa. Atlas was the son of the Titan Iapetus and the Oceanid Asia or Klyméne, -"Now Iapetus took to wife the neat-ankled maid Clymene, daughter of Ocean, and went up with her into one bed. And she bare him a stout-hearted son, Atlas: also she bare very glorious Menoetius and clever Prometheus, full of various wiles, and scatter-brained Epimetheus." Hyginus emphasises the primordial nature of Atlas by making him the son of Aether and Gaia. In contexts where a Titan and a Titaness are assigned each of the seven planetary powers, Atlas is paired with Phoebe and governs the moon. He had three brothers — Prometheus, Epimetheus and Menoetius.Atlas continues to be a commonly used icon in western culture, as a symbol of strength or stoic endurance. He is often shown kneeling on one knee while supporting an enormous round globe on his back and shoulders. The globe originally represented the celestial sphere of ancient astronomy, rather than the earth. The use of the term atlas as a name for collections of terrestrial maps and the modern understanding of the earth as a sphere have combined to inspire the many depictions of Atlas' burden as the earth.




'Ἄττις' - (ATTIS)

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Vittorio CarvelliAttis was the consort of Cybele in Phrygian and Greek mythology. His priests were eunuchs, as explained by origin myths pertaining to Attis and castration. The 19th-century identification with the name Atys encountered in Herodotus (i.34-45) as the historical name of the son of Croesus, as "Atys the sun god, slain by the boar's tusk of winter", and as a life-death-rebirth deity as described by James Frazer, are mistaken. As Attis grew, his beauty was godlike, and Agdistis as Cybele, then fell in love with him. But the foster parents of Attis sent him to Pessinos, where he was to wed the king's daughter. According to some versions the King of Pessinos was Midas. Just as the marriage-song was being sung, Cybele appeared in her transcendent power, and Attis went mad and cut off his genitals. Attis' father-in-law-to-be, the king who was giving his daughter in marriage, followed suit, prefiguring the self-castrating corybantes who devoted themselves to Cybele. But Agdistis repented and saw to it that the body of Attis should neither rot at all nor decay. Attis was reborn as an evergreen pine tree. This rebirth was celebrated on 25 March - the festival of Hilaria.




HYACINTHUS

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'Προμηθεύς' - (PROMETHEUS)

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Vittorio CarvelliIn Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: for "forethought"), is a Titan, the son of Iapetus and Themis, and brother to Atlas, Epimetheus and Menoetius. He was a champion of mankind, known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals. Zeus then punished him for his crime by having him bound to a rock while a great eagle ate his liver every day only to have it grow back to be eaten again the next day. His myth has been treated by a number of ancient sources, in which Prometheus is credited with – or blamed for – playing a pivotal role in the early history of mankind.





'YOUNG PROMETHEUS'
عارية بروميثيوس

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'YOUNG ENDYMION'

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'ENDYMION AND THE MOON'

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'CONTEMPORARY NARCISSUS'

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Ἔρως - (EROS)
إيروس إله الحب

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Eros - in Greek mythology, was the primordial god of sexual love and beauty. He was also worshipped as a fertility deity. His Roman counterpart was Cupid ("desire"), also known as Amor ("love"). In some myths, he was the son of the deities Aphrodite and Ares, but according to Plato's Symposium, he was conceived by Poros (Plenty) and Penia(Poverty) at Aphrodite's birthday. Like Dionysus, he was sometimes referred to as Eleutherios, "the liberator".





'πᾶν'
(MARIO AS PAN)

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Γανυμήδης - (GANYMEDE & ZEUS)

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Vittorio Carvelli. In Greek mythology, Ganymede, or Ganymedes, is a divine hero whose homeland was Troy. He was a prince, son of the eponymous Tros of Dardania and of Callirrhoe, and brother of Ilus and Assaracus. Ganymede was the most attractive of mortals, which led Zeus, in the form of an eagle, to abduct him for service as cup-bearer to the gods and, in Classical and Hellenistic Greece, as Zeus's eromenos. For the etymology of his name, Robert Graves' The Greek Myths offers ganyesthai + medea, "rejoicing in virility". The word "catamite" (boy or youth kept by a man for sexual purposes) is derived from Ganymede.One of the moons of Jupiter is named after him, and was discovered by Galileo Galilei.




Γανυμήδης - (GANYMEDE & ZEUS)

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'SAGITTARIUS - THE ARCHER'

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In Greek mythology, Sagittarius is identified as a centaur: half human, half horse. In some legends, the Centaur Chiron was the son of Philyra and Saturn, who was said to have changed himself into a horse to escape his jealous wife, Rhea. Chiron was eventually immortalised in the constellation of Centaurus or in some version, Sagittarius. The arrow of this constellation points towards the star Antares, the "heart of the scorpion".




'SAGITTARIUS - THE ARCHER'

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'Νάρκισσος' - ( NARCISSUS )

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Vittorio Carvelli. Narcissus or Narkissos (Greek: Νάρκισσος), possibly derived from ναρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness," in Greek mythology was a hunter from the territory of Thespiae in Boeotia who was renowned for his beauty.He was exceptionally proud, in that he disdained those who loved him. As divine punishment he fell in love with his own reflection in a pool, not realizing it was merely an image, and he wasted away to death, not being able to leave the beauty of his own reflection. Several versions of this myth have survived from ancient sources. The classic version is by Ovid, found in book 3 of his Metamorphoses (completed 8 AD). An earlier version ascribed to the poet Parthenius of Nicaea, composed around 50 BC, was recently rediscovered among the Oxyrhynchus papyri at Oxford. Unlike Ovid's version, this one ends with Narcissus committing suicide.




'Νάρκισσος' - ( NARCISSUS )

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'Νάρκισσος' - ( NARCISSUS )

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'PETER PAN & TINK'

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Vittorio Carvelli.Peter Pan is a character created by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie (1860–1937). A mischievous boy who can fly and magically refuses to grow up, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on the small island of Neverland as the leader of his gang the Lost Boys, interacting with mermaids, Indians, fairies, and pirates, and from time to time meeting ordinary children from the world outside. In addition to two distinct works by Barrie, the character has been featured in a variety of media and merchandise, both adapting and expanding on Barrie's works.

for more information about J M Barrie & Peter Pan go to: http://www.scribd.com/doc/18746429/So-Long-Ago-So-Clear




'PETER PAN'

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'PETER PAN'

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'PETER PAN'

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'PETER PAN EXPOSED'
(Male Nude Study)

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"THE GOD RISING'

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"YOUNG SATYR WITH A FLUTE'

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"YOUNG PAN WITH A FLUTE'

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NEW !

for the full story of Gracchus - and many new images go to:



'the story of Marcus Gaius Aelius - who became a slave a boy, and the favorite of the fabulously wealthy Gnaeus Octavius Gracchus.
On the death of Gracchus, Marcus was given his freedom, and inherited his master's wealth, becoming Marcus Gaius Gracchus - one of the richest men in the Empire.'


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